HAWAII FORESTRY EXTENSION

Dr. J. B. Friday
CTAHR/ University of Hawaiʻi
Cooperative Extension Service
875 Komohana Street
Hilo, HI 96720
Telephone: (808) 969-8254
Fax: (808) 981-5211
Email: jbfriday@hawaii.edu

 

Past Research Projects

Development of Shade Coffee AgroEcosystems in Hawaii

Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
H. C. Bittenbender, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR

kaolinite

There is a need for shade coffee agroecosystem designs suitable for a variety of coffee growers and regions in Hawaii. This research will examine the effectiveness of alternative shade treatments on coffee ecophysiology, growth and bean yield, and coffee quality for different coffee varieties and growing regions. Link to video impact report. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Travis Idol (idol@hawaii.edu). HAW00121-1017S

Ecological Assessment and Economic Feasibility of a Practical Strategy for Regenerating Koa Forests in Hawai‘i

Dulal Borthakur, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR
Paul Scowcroft, Institute of Pacific Islands Forstry, USDA Forest Service
Nguyen V Hue, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR
Joseph DeFrank, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR
PingSun Leung, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR

The economic viability of the koa forest industry in Hawaii depends on the regeneration and maintenance of healthy koa stands. At present, there is no established management strategy for reestablishment of koa forest in the areas of continued harvesting. This project will develop a practical strategy for maximizing koa regeneration in areas which are currently infested with kikuyu grass. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Dulal Borthakur (dulal@hawaii.edu). HAW00565-05G

Biochemical Characterization of Acacia koa for Commercial Value and Ecological Attributes

Dulal Borthakur, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR

Acacia koa (koa) is the most valued timber wood of Hawaii. Koa wood products are highly valued for their attractive qualities in grain and color. The depletion of koa from native and remnant forests has resulted in the harvest of lower quality wood. In some parts of Hawaii koa forests are heavily infested with Fusarium wilt. This research will develop scientific methods for identifying biochemical qualities associated with wood color and disease resistance. Furthermore, identifying non-wood products as functional foods with neutraceutical properties will create a new paradigm for koa forestry as a value-added production system. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Dulal Borthakur (dulal@hawaii.edu). HAW00560-M

The Invasiveness of the Noxious Weed Gorse (Ulex Europaeus L.) Influenced by Symbiosis in Agricultural and Natural Habitats of Hawai‘i

Dulal Borthakur, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR

Gorse is a noxious weed species that is threatening natural habitats and agro-ecosystems around the world, including Hawaii. This research will identify soil nutrients and soil microbes that can promote growth infestation. We will conduct a risk assessment for gorse infestation in all major Hawaiian islands by measuring ecological indicators associated with the invasive capacity of gorse in Hawaii. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Dulal Borthakur (dulal@hawaii.edu). HAW00529-04G

An Innovative Approach to Measure Non-Market Benefits of Invasive Species Control Program

Catherine Chan-Halbrendt, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Miconia

There is a need for evaluating the benefits of controlling miconia in Hawaii; after all, without accounting for the benefits of control, the picture is incomplete. Without knowing the benefits of management, there appears to be little motivation for action or resulting in inefficient allocation of funding to solve the problem. The objective of this research is to develop a framework using CCE to estimate the benefits of invasive species control programs using Miconia as a case. The result is expressed in a monetary measure, Willingness to Pay (WTP) which measures the public valuation of each control program. The information will assist decision makers in their decision to support the control programs. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Chan-Halbrendt (chanhalb@hawaii.edu). HAW00136-M

Economics of Managing Invasive Species in Tropical and Subtropical Areas of the US-Hawai‘i

Carol A Ferguson, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

The specific problem addressed by this project is the absence of a comprehensive pest risk management system that combines economics and scientific analyses into a single decision-making framework. Although the problem of invasives has as much to do with economics as with ecology, the decision-making framework on introduction and spread of pests has traditionally been the domain of the biological scientific community. This project will develop and test a comprehensive modeling framework and risk management computer software to manage invasive species, plus establish a collaborative interdisciplinary network for invasive species management. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Carol Ferguson (cafergus@hawaii.edu). HAW00107-05G

Identify Koa Pathogens in Forests and Plantations, Locate Disease Free Areas, and Develop Disease Control Options for Plantation Establishment

Janice Uchida, Department of Plant & Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR
J. B. Friday, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Shaobin Zhong, Department of Plant & Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

The causes of koa wilt and decline needs to be determined. The project attempts to improve koa silvaculture and reforestation efforts by addressing the role of pathogens and their distribution. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Janice Uchida (juchida@hawaii.edu). HAW00951-M

Acacia koa Soilborne Disease Management

S. C. Nelson, Department of Plant & Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Acacia koa is severely affected by soil borne disease problems in Hawaii. This project examines grafting technology to produce potentially disease-resistant Acacia koa plants. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Scot Nelson (snelson@hawaii.edu). HAW00957-H

Molecular Identification and Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum F. sp. koae, The Causal Agent of Koa Wilt in Hawai‘i

Shaobin Zhong, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

The koa wilt disease causes a serious problem in koa plantations, but its origin, distribution and etiology are still not well understood. Lack of information about the pathogen and effective methods for pathogen identification and characterization prevents the disease management. This project develops molecular tools for rapid identification of the Fusarium species or forms causing the wilt disease in koa plants and determines the genetic variation of the pathogen. Development of specific DNA primers will allow rapid and reliable identification of the presence of the particular causal organism (i.e., which species and which strain within a species) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Shaobin Zhong (zhongs@hawaii.edu). HAW01910-06G

Improved Utilization and Protection of Forest Products in Hawaii from Termite Attack

J. Kenneth Grace, Department of Plant & Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR
Julian Yates, Department of Plant & Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

soldier termites

Wood is the principle construction material in use in Hawaii, and termites are the most economically destructive insect pests in the State. Improved methods for protecting wood products and wood in service are needed by the general public, and by the construction, forestry, and forest products sectors. The purpose of this study is to determine the distribution of termites in Hawaii, identify and evaluate termite-resistant wood products for use or manufacture in Hawaii, and determine which soil insecticides are most effective for termite prevention under tropical environmental conditions. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. J. Kenneth Grace (kennethg@hawaii.edu). HAW00940-M

University of Hawaii Termite Project: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~entomol

Watershed Based Land Use Management: An Integrated Field and Modeling Approach

Ali Fares, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Carl Evensen, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Current work intends to develop a management tool that will help better understand the impact of land use on forested watershed hydrology and water quality. Findings of this research program will be helpful for many national and state programs in Hawaii. The end users of the land-user management tools are state, local and federal agencies in addition to watershed managers.

The main goal of this long-term research plan is to develop an integrated research approach at the forested watershed continuum by combining multi-scale field experiments with a strong numerical modeling to enhance our understanding of watershed hydrological processes, water yield and water quality as a result of variation of different controlling parameters, i.e., land use (reforestation/deforestation, invasive species, agricultural use, urbanization) extreme weather conditions (drought, flooding). Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Ali Fares (afares@hawaii.edu). HAW00134-M

Field and Numerical Evaluation of Best Management Practices to Protect Water Resources in the Hanalei Watershed

Hanalei

Ali Fares, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Carl Evensen, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Aly I El-Kadi, Department of Geology and Geophysics, UH Mānoa

There are no specific recommendations for buffer zone widths in Hawaii. There is a need to develop such recommendation under Hawaii field conditions. Test different buffer zones using different plant species both experimentally and numerically. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Ali Fares (afares@hawaii.edu). HAW00129-06G

Inoculation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Nursery to Improve Early Establishment of Native Hawaiian Trees

Susan C. Miyasaka, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR
Mitiku Habte, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Hawaii has lost more than half of its endemic bird species, and one major factor is loss of habitat. This project examines inoculation of native tree species with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus as a means to improve growth in the nursery, as well as survival and growth in the field. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Susan Miyasaka (miyasaka@hawaii.edu). HAW00805-M

Understanding the Impacts of Soil Acidity and Associated Toxicities of Aluminum and Manganese on Acacia Koa Root Symbioses and Tree Growth

Mitiku Habte, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR
Paul Scowcroft, Institute of Pacific Islands Forstry, USDA Forest Service

Acid soil infertility and associated toxicities of aluminum and manganese are barriers to the reforestation of former sugarcane lands in Hawaii. The purpose of the study is to facilitate reforestation of acid soils through the combined use of acid-toerant genotypes of Acacia koa, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and bradyrhizobia. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Mitiku Habte (mitiku@hawaii.edu). HAW00876-05G

Koa Productivity and Nutrient Use Efficiency in Response to Fertilization

Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
J. B. Friday, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Acacia koa is an important ecological and economic species in Hawaii. Effective silvicultural practices are needed to ensure ecosystem health and economic return. The purpose of this project is to understand the productivity and nutrient cycling responses of regenerating koa forests to thinning and fertilization treatments. The long-term goal is to develop effective silvicultural treatments to ensure ecosystem health, productivity, and economic returns of koa timber. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Travis Idol (idol@hawaii.edu). HAW00155-M

Development, Wilt Evaluation and Marketing of Improved Seeds of Acacia koa

James L. Brewbaker, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR
J. B. Friday, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Koa cannot be grown in plantations due to wilt disease. No seed sources with assured resistance are available to growers. We appear to have made major genetic progress in breeding koa wilt resistance. Seed from these plus-tree orchards will be wilt-tested, and an orchard established for wilt-resistant progenies of superior form and growth rate. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. J. L. Brewbaker (brewbake@hawaii.edu). HAW00809-M

Controlling Invasive Species Using Native Plant Agroforestry Systems

Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Tamara Ticktin, Botany Department, UH Manoa

R.W. Bussmann, Lyon Arboretum, UH Manoa

Invasive plants threaten the biological, cultural, and economic diversity and integrity of tropical island systems. This project attempts to control invasive species through the establishment and management of a native plant agroforestry system. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Travis Idol (idol@hawaii.edu). HAW00122-04G

DNA Barcode Database for Invasive and Native Plant Species Identification in Hawai‘i

Gernot Presting, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR

Invasive species, once landed in Hawaii, rapidly colonize the Hawaiian ecosystem and replace indigenous species. Effectively combating invasive species requires facile, rapid and definitive detection and identification of hundreds of organisms at Hawaii’s ports of entry. We propose the development of a method that will allow definitive identification of plant material at any lifecycle stage. Link to USDA CRIS Report. Contact: Dr. Gernot Presting (gernot@hawaii.edu). HAW00582-06G

Bibilography: CTAHR forestry and agroforestry research publications since 1990

Click here to link to information about RECENT Forestry Research Projects